Category Archives: Top Tips

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WHAT TO WEAR TO A GO SEE

First of all, what is a go see? A go see is basically an audition for models where you can meet with an agency, a manager, or a designer.

So, when you go to a casting call or a go see, remember that the rule of thumb is to keep your styling to a minimum! What you really should be bringing with you is your natural beauty and talent—these are what they should remember the most about you.

What to Wear to a Go See

The agencies usually send in a list of things that you need to bring and this includes your portfolio. Make sure you research beforehand what the modeling job is for so you can include photos of a similar theme shoot or modeling experience.

When in doubt as to what to wear or how to look, always go for simple styling but make sure to keep your look sleek and neat. Get in touch with John Robert Powers for more modeling tips.

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HOW TO PREPARE FOR YOUR FIRST GO SEE

A go see is an interview or an audition for models. If you have the confidence, self-esteem, and the capability to show how well you can project the client’s concepts, you’ll get the job. Take note of these tips:

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Remember to be cautious of the go see or casting calls that you go to. To avoid getting scammed, make sure you only attend the events hosted or run by trusted agencies, designers, etc. For more tips and information about modeling, get in touch with John Robert Powers and let us help you on your journey to the top.

Feb 12_Blog 3

The Font Choice

The font choices you make are as important as the clothes you decide to wear. For example, no matter how nice the suit a person is wearing, your impression of them could be ruined if they’re wearing dirty, beat-up sneakers. Your typography may only be 10% of your presentation deck, but it’ll have a major impact on how your audience absorbs the information you’re giving them.

1. Try to use safe typefaces.
Just like your favorite everyday shoes, there are some typefaces that will always be safe to use in a presentation. These fonts are always clear, legible and will not distract the audience from the content of your presentation. Try using fonts like Lucida Grande, Helvetica, Georgia or Palatino.

2. Use decisive contrast.
If you need to use multiple typefaces (in order to make certain key words or phrases in your presentation stand out), use fonts that have large, contrasting differences. Note, however, that not all different typefaces will work well together. There are some that look quite nice when they are in tandem. Try figuring out which fonts have similar x-height or stroke weight, or make your life easier by using this site: https://www.canva.com/font-combinations/

3. Avoid using wild typefaces.
Just like your outfit, if everything is too wild, people will just end up staring at you; rather than listening to what you have to say. So, apply that same thought to your presentation deck. If all your fonts are too wild, people will just spend their time looking at the deck, instead of absorbing the content. Use wild fonts as your headers, but not for the entire thing.

As you continue to make your presentation decks, you’ll start to figure out which fonts work best for your audience, and which ones look best with each other. Whichever font you choose, always make sure you remain confident during your presentation.
Learn more at John Robert Powers.

Feb 9_Blog 2

Make the Good Better

An excellent presentation can be the deciding factor in any type of meeting. Do you have everything you need for your presentation? Great! The fundamental goal in any presentation is for it to change the audience in one way or another so here’s how to make sure that your audience remembers what you’re saying:

1. Follow the right sequence.
One of the first things to remember is that there is this thing called a serial position effect. Essentially, this means that the first thing that is presented in a sequence is best remembered by an audience. A good way to go about your presentation is this: “Tell people what you’re going to tell them, tell them, and tell them what you told them”.

2. Draw connections.
Connections matter when remembering things. You might not remember the entirety of the presentation, but if you can remember parts of it, and are able to connect them to other parts, then you should be good. Making connections among the key points in your talk increases the amount that people will remember from what you present.

3. Make the audience work.
In order to get your audience to really process and absorb the information you’re giving them to memory, they have to put in a bit of effort. If your audience thinks deeply about the points you’ve made in your presentation, they’re more likely to remember what you told them later on. Ask your audience questions. Let them vote on certain alternatives, just get them thinking about the points that you are making.

4. Make it simple.
If you can sum up your presentation in just one sentence, what would that sentence be? Try to include the aspect of your topic that has the biggest impact to your audience. If you’re having a difficult time, ask yourself: “If my audience only remembers one thing from my talk, what should it be?”

Communication coach Dianna Booherhas once said, “If you can’t write your message in one sentence, you can’t say it in an hour.”

Remember to present with confidence and believe in the things you’re saying!
Learn more at John Robert Powers.

Feb 7_Blog 1

The Types of Presenter

Your personality shapes how you handle a certain task; like when you present to a client. In order to make sure your presentation goes well, you first have to understand what kind of presenter you are. We’ve got the six different kinds of presenters all lined up for you, so try to figure out which one you are, and get to presenting.

The Coach
This speaker is energetic, and great at connecting with people, but if the audience is lazy, or has low energy, they might lose their enthusiasm. The coach has the tendency to talk more than listen. And when practicing, this presenter will go to a quiet place, pace around the room, and commit their script to memory.

The Inventor
Although the inventor is the last person to volunteer, they’re very good at connecting ideas for people. The Inventor may have a difficult time holding on to a lot of information, and will build the deck right away, as it helps them get a firm grasp of the material.

The Counselor
This speaker is eloquent, and likes to talk about their ideas with a stream of logic that’s easy to follow. However, they may fail to connect with their audience and seem dry and cynical. This presenter builds their slides by taking from previous decks,

The Storyteller
S/he speaks with feeling and rhythm, and wins over audiences easily. When speaking to audiences, they add depth and detail to the story, but this leads them to losing their structure and flow. When building the slides, the Storyteller prefers someone else to create the base deck, and they’ll add their own personal bits later on.

The Teacher
The Teacher gets complex ideas across, and are well-structured speakers. However, this speaker tends to care more about the material than the audience. This presenter starts off with an outline, and creates a talk-track off of it, and their decks are in logical order.

The Coordinator
S/he prefers to be in the audience, and not the speaker, but still gives well-structured presentations when necessary. The Coordinator is uncomfortable working off others’ materials, and therefore builds their own decks, using keypoints that they will relate to personal experience.
Remember that everyone has natural strengths and weaknesses when it comes to presenting, but the constant requirement in a good presenter is confidence. Learn more about confidence at John Robert Powers.