Tag Archives: Present with confidence

Feb 9_Blog 2

Make the Good Better

An excellent presentation can be the deciding factor in any type of meeting. Do you have everything you need for your presentation? Great! The fundamental goal in any presentation is for it to change the audience in one way or another so here’s how to make sure that your audience remembers what you’re saying:

1. Follow the right sequence.
One of the first things to remember is that there is this thing called a serial position effect. Essentially, this means that the first thing that is presented in a sequence is best remembered by an audience. A good way to go about your presentation is this: “Tell people what you’re going to tell them, tell them, and tell them what you told them”.

2. Draw connections.
Connections matter when remembering things. You might not remember the entirety of the presentation, but if you can remember parts of it, and are able to connect them to other parts, then you should be good. Making connections among the key points in your talk increases the amount that people will remember from what you present.

3. Make the audience work.
In order to get your audience to really process and absorb the information you’re giving them to memory, they have to put in a bit of effort. If your audience thinks deeply about the points you’ve made in your presentation, they’re more likely to remember what you told them later on. Ask your audience questions. Let them vote on certain alternatives, just get them thinking about the points that you are making.

4. Make it simple.
If you can sum up your presentation in just one sentence, what would that sentence be? Try to include the aspect of your topic that has the biggest impact to your audience. If you’re having a difficult time, ask yourself: “If my audience only remembers one thing from my talk, what should it be?”

Communication coach Dianna Booherhas once said, “If you can’t write your message in one sentence, you can’t say it in an hour.”

Remember to present with confidence and believe in the things you’re saying!
Learn more at John Robert Powers.